General Gardening

3 Garden Dangers for Cats

Cat and bean plantCats love to come outside when balcony container gardeners are working on or checking up on the plants. They love to smell the smells, watch passers-by, chase bugs or just bask in the sun. Balcony gardeners love to spend their outdoor time with their cats, and to keep your cat and other animals safe, you’ll need to keep a few things in mind.

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FAQs About Gardening in the Shade

Caladium bicolorQuestion: I was thinking of getting flowers for my apartment patio, but my patio is on the ground floor and does not get much light. Any suggestions? See answer>>

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Vermicomposting in Tight Spaces

By Tyler Weaver

Worm factory compost binBalcony container gardeners who want to start treating container plants to some quality potting soil can choose from several methods of composting in tight spaces. If you are able to compost on a balcony, there are several options available, such as purchasing a compost tumbler or building one from just two buckets. These are ideal for keeping waste neat while requiring minimal effort to keep them going. A periodic turn of the barrel or stirring with a stick is all that's needed.

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Baby Food Garden

If you have a green thumb and don’t want to spend a lot of extra money on organic baby food, you may want to try creating a baby food garden in your backyard or balcony container garden. Babies will eat a variety of foods from the garden, so why not try making some homemade organic baby food!

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6 Easy Steps to Sterilizing Potting Soil

Sterilize Potting SoilWeeds, fungi, diseases and other unwanted pathogens in previously used potting soil can harm your container plants in the next growing season. Many living things in the garden soil are actually beneficial for your container plants, including bacteria, fungi, worms, insects and more. These living things break down nutrients in the soil so plants are able to use them. But in addition to beneficial living things, some diseases and pathogens can live in your soil for a long time, waiting around until they can infect your next batch of crops.

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