General Gardening

Vermicomposting in Tight Spaces

By Tyler Weaver

Worm factory compost binBalcony container gardeners who want to start treating container plants to some quality potting soil can choose from several methods of composting in tight spaces. If you are able to compost on a balcony, there are several options available, such as purchasing a compost tumbler or building one from just two buckets. These are ideal for keeping waste neat while requiring minimal effort to keep them going. A periodic turn of the barrel or stirring with a stick is all that's needed.

Read more...

22nd Annual Southern California Spring Garden Show

22nd Annual Southern California Spring Garden Show

The 22nd Annual Southern California Spring Garden Show was held April 28 through May 1, 2011 at South Coast Plaza’s Crate and Barrel/Macy’s Home Store Wing in Costa Mesa, California. The four-day show included:

Read more...

10 Tips for Healthy Container Plants: Part 1

Sunflower1. Do not overwater. Probably the biggest mistake that new container gardeners make is overwatering their container plants. Watering too much is more often worse for plants than not providing enough water. When plant roots are submersed in water for too long, they don’t get enough oxygen and the roots rot. Overwatering can also cause mushrooms and fungus in the container's soil, which will attract fungus gnats in your balcony garden. Learn more about watering>>

Read more...

FAQs About Watering Plants

Watering canQuestion: What is the best time of the day to water plants? I live in Sydney, Australia, and sometimes it gets really hot. See answer>>

Read more...

6 Easy Steps to Sterilizing Potting Soil

Sterilize Potting SoilWeeds, fungi, diseases and other unwanted pathogens in previously used potting soil can harm your container plants in the next growing season. Many living things in the garden soil are actually beneficial for your container plants, including bacteria, fungi, worms, insects and more. These living things break down nutrients in the soil so plants are able to use them. But in addition to beneficial living things, some diseases and pathogens can live in your soil for a long time, waiting around until they can infect your next batch of crops.

Read more...

Additional information